The art of compassion

So, today I stumbled across this 2002 Korean film called, The Way Home. It’s a great movie that had me crying several tears, in a good way though! Anyway, it is about a spoiled little boy who goes to visit his grandmother for the summer. His grandmother is an elderly woman, but she still gets around well. Her living arrangement isn’t what the little boy is used to, because she still draws her water from a well, hand washes their clothes and hang them outside on the clothes line to dry, and either grows her food or walk several miles to purchase it from local farmers. 

Her back is humped over from years of carrying supplies that’s necessary for living on her back, and she’s also mute. The little boy is very mean to his grandmother. He calls her a retard. He yells at her and he spends most of his time playing his game. Throughout all of this the grandmother is still compassionate towards him. 

She remains calm at all times. She makes sure he is well fed, and even takes special requests from him as to what he’d like to eat. He requested Kentucky fried chicken, and I cracked up when she brought back a chicken from a local farm, and she boiled it. The little boy cried because he wanted fried chicken, he even slapped the cup of rice out of his grandmother’s hand, but she just calmly picked up the bowl and the rice off of the floor and she didn’t say a word. I know you may be thinking, if she’s mute, she can’t say a word, well she could have showed her frustration through sign language or she could have done any other number of things, but her actions, spoke louder than any words ever could. 

She didn’t allow what her grandson did, to change who she is. She remained unbothered, and whenever the little boy needed anything, she would come to his rescue, with zero hesitation. I’m not going to lie, I wanted to spank his behind myself for being ungrateful, but I kept watching. Eventually, the grandmother’s compassion began to have a positive effect on the little boy. He saw the sacrifices she made to make him happy, and he saw how selfless she was, and it moved him to show her compassion. 

He began to help her out as needed, and even took care of her when she was sick. When his mom returned at the end of summer to get him, you could tell he was really going to miss his grandmother, although neither one of them said a word. As he and his mom was leaving, he ran to the end of the bus and signaled he was sorry to his grandmother and he waved her goodbye until the bus was no longer in sight. I believe who ever wrote this story is brilliant. The writer made the grandmother mute on purpose to teach the audience a lesson. 

Sometimes things are better left unsaid. Also, it’s better to be moved with compassion than to be moved by anger. I’m glad I watched this movie, because it was just confirmation about what God had just told me earlier this morning. Someone pushed the wrong button on me, BUT instead of reacting out of anger, I decided not to say something I’d probably regret later, and I chose to understand where the person was coming from. I just thank God for transformation, which is still in the works by the way.

I used to be a woman with no filter. I told you how I felt, and could careless how you felt about it. Now I’m more considerate of others, and try to understand people a lot more than I have in the past. I try my best to follow the golden rule, “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” I didn’t say I’ve mastered it, I said, I try my best, but hey, thank God for Jesus right?

Anyway, I hope this has helped someone today, and if you can check out that movie, do it, and remember how you treat others shouldn’t have anything to do with how they treat you! 

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